Blog

3 Mexican Dishes Americans Should Be Ordering But Aren't

temp-post-image

Authentic Mexican Cusine

Authentic Mexican cuisine is known for its unhindered flavors, bursting across your taste buds with every bite. Unfortunately, in some US cities Mexican food has become synonymous with just about anything that has a sombrero in its logo -- a trend that has become all too common and carries potential racist connotations.

The best Mexican food cannot be found in a chain restaurant that boasts cheesy enchilada combos and margarita happy hour specials, and the distinction between truly authentic Mexican food and mashups like "Tex-Mex" or "Cal-Mex" must be clearly outlined. That being said, if you find any top restaurants that offer these three delicious dishes -- or want to try your hand at recreating authentic Mexican flavors in your own home -- keep reading.


Cemita: The cemita is a Poblano innovation; a sandwich with deep-friend breaded meat at its center, they even include battered and fried cutlets of pork, beef, or chicken (known as milanesa) in the brioche-like bun. Condiments such as shredded queso, avocado, chipotle, and the fragrant Mexican herb pápalo are then piled on for the ultimate lunchtime meal.

Birria: Birria is a spicy meat stew that reigns supreme in Guadalajara, Jalisco (which is also said to be the birthplace of tequila). By marinating goat meat in a spicy guajillo chili-based broth, the stew is as satisfying as it is warming. It is a popular choice at weddings and is usually served with bread, or plated in taco-form.

Pozole: Made from hominy (a food made from dried maize kernels that are soaked and cooked through a process known as nixtamalization), pozole is a wonderfully hearty and restorative pork soup. It is prepared from a variety of sauces -- such as red chili (guajillo or ancho), green (tomatillos, cilantro jalapeños or pipitas), or white (neither) -- and includes diced onions, shredded cabbage, sliced radishes, lime, and chili peppers.

Mexican cuisine is already extremely popular among Americans, holding its own against the Chinese and Indian food markets. If people knew the flavors and experiences they were missing out on by only frequenting chain-restaurants they would clearly be able to distinguish between knock-off Mexican restaurants and the best Mexican food they've ever tasted.

3 Mexican Dishes Americans Should Be Ordering But Aren't

temp-post-image

Authentic Mexican Cusine

Authentic Mexican cuisine is known for its unhindered flavors, bursting across your taste buds with every bite. Unfortunately, in some US cities Mexican food has become synonymous with just about anything that has a sombrero in its logo -- a trend that has become all too common and carries potential racist connotations.

The best Mexican food cannot be found in a chain restaurant that boasts cheesy enchilada combos and margarita happy hour specials, and the distinction between truly authentic Mexican food and mashups like "Tex-Mex" or "Cal-Mex" must be clearly outlined. That being said, if you find any top restaurants that offer these three delicious dishes -- or want to try your hand at recreating authentic Mexican flavors in your own home -- keep reading.


Cemita: The cemita is a Poblano innovation; a sandwich with deep-friend breaded meat at its center, they even include battered and fried cutlets of pork, beef, or chicken (known as milanesa) in the brioche-like bun. Condiments such as shredded queso, avocado, chipotle, and the fragrant Mexican herb pápalo are then piled on for the ultimate lunchtime meal.

Birria: Birria is a spicy meat stew that reigns supreme in Guadalajara, Jalisco (which is also said to be the birthplace of tequila). By marinating goat meat in a spicy guajillo chili-based broth, the stew is as satisfying as it is warming. It is a popular choice at weddings and is usually served with bread, or plated in taco-form.

Pozole: Made from hominy (a food made from dried maize kernels that are soaked and cooked through a process known as nixtamalization), pozole is a wonderfully hearty and restorative pork soup. It is prepared from a variety of sauces -- such as red chili (guajillo or ancho), green (tomatillos, cilantro jalapeños or pipitas), or white (neither) -- and includes diced onions, shredded cabbage, sliced radishes, lime, and chili peppers.

Mexican cuisine is already extremely popular among Americans, holding its own against the Chinese and Indian food markets. If people knew the flavors and experiences they were missing out on by only frequenting chain-restaurants they would clearly be able to distinguish between knock-off Mexican restaurants and the best Mexican food they've ever tasted.

Talavera © 2016