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Miami's Latin American Scene Expands With New Art Space

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Miami has been a Latin American melting pot for decades. People come from far and wide for the warm weather, thriving night life, and flourishing Latin American culture. Though there are a number of popular spots (and restaurantes en Coral Gables) in Miami and its neighboring towns, we suspect the Atchugarry Art Center will be a fast favorite.

The 25,000 sq. ft. former warehouse took three long years to transform into an expansive art space, and opened just in time for Art Basel and Miami's annual art week. Uruguayan sculptor Pablo Atchugarry and his son Piero were the masterminds behind the center; they wanted to create a space that functions as both a commercial gallery and a place to exhibits historic and contemporary works.

"It's a bet on Miami as a cultural center," said Piero. "We have had a very welcoming feeling from people who live in Miami. We like to add our little grain of sand to the community." To echo this sentiment, the Atchugarry's are making entry and events at the privately-funded space completely free to attend.

To celebrate the center's inauguration, Pablo and Piero are exhibiting five early (and rare) surrealist paintings by Afro-Cuban artist Wifredo Lam. Additionally, they're displaying a retrospective of work by the late Uruguayan artist Jose Pedro Costigliolo; his work ranged from post-War graphic design to geometric abstracts so precise they seem almost machine rendered. The effect is both free-flowing and restricted at once.

According to Pablo, the main goal is to facilitate connections between emerging and established U.S. artists (specifically those of Miami) and Latin American artists (specifically those of Uruguay).

"Artists contribute to the society of raising their voyages and sharing their messages," said Pablo.

Since the displays will be up until February 16, visitors to Miami will be able to take a Latin American adventure during their stay. By stopping at restaurantes en Coral Gables and eating some of the best Mexican cuisine, residents and tourists alike will be able to taste the history of this flavorful and ancient (Mexican food is believed to be derived from what the Mayans prepared over 2000 years ago) culture.

So, what are you waiting for? It's time to head over to the top restaurantes Mexicanos en Miami and try some of the best Mexican food you've ever had, then wander over to the massive Atchugarry Art Center.

Miami's Latin American Scene Expands With New Art Space

temp-post-image

Miami has been a Latin American melting pot for decades. People come from far and wide for the warm weather, thriving night life, and flourishing Latin American culture. Though there are a number of popular spots (and restaurantes en Coral Gables) in Miami and its neighboring towns, we suspect the Atchugarry Art Center will be a fast favorite.

The 25,000 sq. ft. former warehouse took three long years to transform into an expansive art space, and opened just in time for Art Basel and Miami's annual art week. Uruguayan sculptor Pablo Atchugarry and his son Piero were the masterminds behind the center; they wanted to create a space that functions as both a commercial gallery and a place to exhibits historic and contemporary works.

"It's a bet on Miami as a cultural center," said Piero. "We have had a very welcoming feeling from people who live in Miami. We like to add our little grain of sand to the community." To echo this sentiment, the Atchugarry's are making entry and events at the privately-funded space completely free to attend.

To celebrate the center's inauguration, Pablo and Piero are exhibiting five early (and rare) surrealist paintings by Afro-Cuban artist Wifredo Lam. Additionally, they're displaying a retrospective of work by the late Uruguayan artist Jose Pedro Costigliolo; his work ranged from post-War graphic design to geometric abstracts so precise they seem almost machine rendered. The effect is both free-flowing and restricted at once.

According to Pablo, the main goal is to facilitate connections between emerging and established U.S. artists (specifically those of Miami) and Latin American artists (specifically those of Uruguay).

"Artists contribute to the society of raising their voyages and sharing their messages," said Pablo.

Since the displays will be up until February 16, visitors to Miami will be able to take a Latin American adventure during their stay. By stopping at restaurantes en Coral Gables and eating some of the best Mexican cuisine, residents and tourists alike will be able to taste the history of this flavorful and ancient (Mexican food is believed to be derived from what the Mayans prepared over 2000 years ago) culture.

So, what are you waiting for? It's time to head over to the top restaurantes Mexicanos en Miami and try some of the best Mexican food you've ever had, then wander over to the massive Atchugarry Art Center.

Miami's Latin American Scene Expands With New Art Space

temp-post-image

Miami has been a Latin American melting pot for decades. People come from far and wide for the warm weather, thriving night life, and flourishing Latin American culture. Though there are a number of popular spots (and restaurantes en Coral Gables) in Miami and its neighboring towns, we suspect the Atchugarry Art Center will be a fast favorite.

The 25,000 sq. ft. former warehouse took three long years to transform into an expansive art space, and opened just in time for Art Basel and Miami's annual art week. Uruguayan sculptor Pablo Atchugarry and his son Piero were the masterminds behind the center; they wanted to create a space that functions as both a commercial gallery and a place to exhibits historic and contemporary works.

"It's a bet on Miami as a cultural center," said Piero. "We have had a very welcoming feeling from people who live in Miami. We like to add our little grain of sand to the community." To echo this sentiment, the Atchugarry's are making entry and events at the privately-funded space completely free to attend.

To celebrate the center's inauguration, Pablo and Piero are exhibiting five early (and rare) surrealist paintings by Afro-Cuban artist Wifredo Lam. Additionally, they're displaying a retrospective of work by the late Uruguayan artist Jose Pedro Costigliolo; his work ranged from post-War graphic design to geometric abstracts so precise they seem almost machine rendered. The effect is both free-flowing and restricted at once.

According to Pablo, the main goal is to facilitate connections between emerging and established U.S. artists (specifically those of Miami) and Latin American artists (specifically those of Uruguay).

"Artists contribute to the society of raising their voyages and sharing their messages," said Pablo.

Since the displays will be up until February 16, visitors to Miami will be able to take a Latin American adventure during their stay. By stopping at restaurantes en Coral Gables and eating some of the best Mexican cuisine, residents and tourists alike will be able to taste the history of this flavorful and ancient (Mexican food is believed to be derived from what the Mayans prepared over 2000 years ago) culture.

So, what are you waiting for? It's time to head over to the top restaurantes Mexicanos en Miami and try some of the best Mexican food you've ever had, then wander over to the massive Atchugarry Art Center.

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